Category Archives: Music and the Brain

Freddie The Frog® iPad App – LEARN MORE – Music Education

Freddie the Frog® is an educational app that introduces kids to the written language of music. The app was developed by the best-selling author of elementary music education materials, Freddie the Frog® books/CDs and plush toys, and Appademia LLC, a software company devoted to mobile applications for the academic world.

Have an iPad lab? Download multiple Freddie The Frog Pro apps in your school’s Education Volume Purchasing Program and get a discount!

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Freddie The Frog® iPad App PAINT – Music Education

Freddie the Frog® is an educational app that introduces kids to the written language of music. The app was developed by the best-selling author of elementary music education materials, Freddie the Frog® books/CDs and plush toys, and Appademia LLC, a software company devoted to mobile applications for the academic world.

Have an iPad lab? Download multiple Freddie The Frog Pro apps in your school’s Education Volume Purchasing Program and get a discount!

Read More

Freddie The Frog® iPad App – GAMES – Music Education

Freddie the Frog® is an educational app that introduces kids to the written language of music. The app was developed by the best-selling author of elementary music education materials, Freddie the Frog® books/CDs and plush toys, and Appademia LLC, a software company devoted to mobile applications for the academic world.

Have an iPad lab? Download multiple Freddie The Frog Pro apps in your school’s Education Volume Purchasing Program and get a discount!

Read More

Freddie The Frog® iPad App – Music Education

Freddie the Frog® is an educational app that introduces kids to the written language of music. The app was developed by the best-selling author of elementary music education materials, Freddie the Frog® books/CDs and plush toys, and Appademia LLC, a software company devoted to mobile applications for the academic world.

Have an iPad lab? Download multiple Freddie The Frog Pro apps in your school’s Education Volume Purchasing Program and get a discount!

Read More

Music Makes Kids Smarter – Prove Me Wrong

In past generations, singing and playing instruments was an integral part of family life.  A great way to express and entertain yourself and others.  We did not realize it, but we were also exercising our brain while we played, causing us to be creative, more vibrant, smarter, etc.  In our current generation, we tend to be passive listeners and consumers as a society, and as a result, shorting our mental development and our children the opportunity to reach their mental potential.
Humans are “wired” for music.  Until recently, scientists did not know how music affected the brain.  The advancement in technology allows scientists to actually “see” brain activity via PET scans and MRI imaging scanning the blood flow in the brain.  Our brains are “wired” with neural pathways.  Most activities only cause a portion of the brain to “light up” with activity; thus, the saying, right brain/left brain, etc.  But there are actually four parts to the brain and music makes ALL of the areas “light up” and create new neural pathways as a person is learning and playing an instrument.  Those neural pathways remain in tact and can be used for other things besides music.  Norman Doidge, in his book, The Brain That Changes Itself, shares case after case of people forcing their brain to change and adapt either voluntarily with discipline, or involuntarily due to odd incidences.  Studies confirm that our brain has plasticity.  “You can’t teach an old dog new tricks” is proven to be a case of “can’t want to,” rather than too old to change.
Daniel Levitin passionately explores the connection between  Music and the Brain in his book of the same name.  Google his name, watch video clips on YouTube, or go to his website.  It’s an exciting time of discovering how little we know and how much there is to learn.  There is definitely enough evidence to recognize it is not in a music teacher’s imagination.  Music has a huge impact on activity in the brain.  You can physically/visually see the growth and changes that happen inside the brain.  The possibilities are endless.  The implications for music therapy and music education are profound.  Just check out PBS video “The Music Instinct.” Neurologist and author, Oliver Sacks relays a true story from his book, Musicophilia, where a man was indirectly struck by lightning through a telephone and three weeks later composing and playing the piano for the first time.  Sacks believes the man was “re-wired” through that experience.  The list goes on and on.
But even if you are still skeptical about music making kids smarter, let’s look at the other benefits.  Socially, music is an ageless hobby creating interaction with great people.  Take a look at any school band or orchestra or top-ranking choir and you will find a huge percentage of the members are in the top 10% of their class and college bound.  Striving for excellence is a given in a musical group.  Everyone has to perfect their part for the group to perform at their best–NObody “sits on the bench.”  Everyone has to pull their weight or the whole group suffers.  Creativity, especially in jazz groups is developed, honed and embraced.  Who couldn’t use more creativity in their workforce? Creativity is what makes the difference and gives any company the cutting edge.
There are many benefits of being involved in making music, but the neural pathways drives home the point and gets our attention.  Scientists are reluctant to state that playing a musical instrument makes you smarter, but all the indicators are there, so let’s look at it from the opposite angle.  Instead of trying to prove that music makes you smarter or good for you and your child, try to prove that it is not. I can’t think of a single reason how learning a musical instrument is detrimental, can you?

Give your child every opportunity and advantage you can. Enroll them in music lessons and watch them grow and mentally develop as they play, create, express, and struggle through the rigors of the discipline mastering an instrument.  You will discover a more creative, brighter and mature person in the making.

Why NOT Music?

There is much research and articles working to support why music is intrinsic and important, and why it should be included in a child’s education and developmental life.

It occurred to me that it would be extremely difficult to find reasons why it should NOT be included in a person’s life.  That is my challenge to you–why should music NOT be included in a person’s life?

Until then, I can only conclude that music is beneficial in multiple ways–from pure pleasure to building synapses in the brain.  Whatever your belief in that range, it still equals something worth instilling and nurturing within yourself, your children, our society and our world.

Prove me wrong.  I dare you.